Introduction
Vocabulary concept 1
Vocabulary concept 2
Vocabulary concept 3
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One of the most common uses of tener is “tener ganas” – “to feel like”. It’s one of our favourites!

 

EnglishSpanish
TenerTo have
Tener ganasTo feel like
Tengo ganas deI feel like
¿De qué tienes ganas?What do you fancy?
Tengo ganas de ir a dormirI feel like going to sleep
Tengo ganas de un buen vinoI feel like a good wine

Introduction
Vocabulary concept 1
Vocabulary concept 2
Vocabulary concept 3
Review progress (all modules)

3 comments. Leave new

For me, ganas sounds like three greedy seabird, gannet. I imagine it squawking for whatever it wants. (I can’t say it gives me a positive image of ganas though. Does anybody else have memory hooks that colour their feeling about a word?)

You say that after “tener ganas de” you use an infinitive. Yet one of the examples does not use an infinitive: ‘Tengo ganas de un buen vino.’ My question is does use of an infinitive simply depend on the context?

Hi Ron
With “tener ganas de”, you can follow this by a verb (in the infinitive), or a noun (like “un bueno vino”). If it’s a verb, then it is always in the infinitive. Hope that helps!

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